Sales Engineer http://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 14:03:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-19.png Sales Engineer http://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/ 32 32 The Toy Association Welcomes Jos Huxley as Senior Vice President, Technical Affairs https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/the-toy-association-welcomes-jos-huxley-as-senior-vice-president-technical-affairs/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/the-toy-association-welcomes-jos-huxley-as-senior-vice-president-technical-affairs/ NEW YORK, August 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The toy associationthe trade association that champions and works for the success of all businesses involved in the creation and delivery of toys and entertainment products for children of all ages, today announced that recognized safety expert toys Jos Huxley will join the organization as senior vice president […]]]>

NEW YORK, August 1, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The toy associationthe trade association that champions and works for the success of all businesses involved in the creation and delivery of toys and entertainment products for children of all ages, today announced that recognized safety expert toys Jos Huxley will join the organization as senior vice president of technical affairs, effective August 1.

In his role, Jos will lead the ongoing development of technical policies and strategies relating to toy safety, environmental sustainability, supply chain issues, factory processes and other related issues, acting as a guide for member companies navigating these and other issues under the umbrella. technical affairs.

Jos joins The Toy Association after more than 28 years at Hasbro, Inc., most recently serving as Senior QA Engineer and Regulatory Specialist at Hasbro. He has been fully engaged in working on US federal and state requirements, including participating in the ASTM F15.22 toy safety subcommittee, as a member of the US delegation to the ISO TC 181 technical committee on toys and its many working groups, and working as an ISO observer with CEN’s Technical Committee for Toys. He has also held leadership positions as Head of the US Delegation to TC 181, Convenor of TC 181/WG 7 on Age Rating, and Elected Convenor of TC 181/WG 1 on Toy Safety – Mechanical Properties. and physical.

“Jos’ strong technical knowledge of U.S. and international toy safety standards, his expertise in toy safety best practices, and his ability to lead, encourage, and guide open discussions and productive decision-making within groups multi-party working arrangements ensure that he is the best candidate for this position,” said Ed Desmond, executive vice president of external affairs for the Toy Association. “We are delighted to welcome Jos and look forward to the contributions of expertise, experience and knowledge he will bring to help members navigate complex security laws and regulations around the world. and succeed in the ever-changing toy and retail landscape.”

Jos said: “I am delighted and grateful for the opportunity to join Ed and the External Affairs team in this important role. I look forward to contributing and maintaining the high level of support The Toy Association provides in its critical and evolving mission to serve the toy and play community by providing safe and fun products that bring so much joy and entertainment to children and families around the world.”

After graduating with honors from Brunel University in the UK in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Design, Jos began his career at Hasbro as a Reliability Engineer in the UK office, moving to Head Office based at Rhode Island in 1998, and eventually assumed the role of Senior QA Engineer. Jos will continue to be based in South County, RI where he lives with his wife and three children.

Over the next six to nine months, Jos will work alongside Alan Kaufmanwho recently transitioned to the role of Senior Technical Affairs Advisor and will then be retiring fully after more than 11 years with The Toy Association and more than 40 years in the toy industry.

“I have thoroughly enjoyed my time at the Toy Association and have found it extremely rewarding to help advance the entire industry as Senior Vice President of Technical Affairs,” Kaufman said. “Jos is the perfect person to fill this role in the future, and I am delighted to continue to play an advisory role to the Association as he joins us, which will make the transition seamless. External Affairs, are committed to maintaining the high level of service that members have come to expect.

About the Toy Association www.toyassociation.org / www.thegeniusofplay.org / www.playsafe.org

Founded in 1916, The Toy Association™, Inc. is the trade association representing all companies involved in the creation and delivery of toys and entertainment products for children of all ages. The Toy Association leads the health and growth of the toy industry in the United States, whose annual economic impact in the United States is $102.4 billion, and is the nation’s most effective resource and influential advocate for hundreds of companies, including manufacturers, retailers, licensors and others who are involved in the youth entertainment industry. Our manufacturer members account for 93% of toy and game sales in the United States, generating the year $38.2 billion US domestic toy market. The Toy Association is the industry voice on the developmental benefits of play and promotes the positive impact of play on child development to consumers and the media. The organization has a long history of toy safety leadership, having helped develop the first comprehensive toy safety standard over 40 years ago, and remains committed to working with medical experts, government, consumers and industry on ongoing programs to ensure safety and enjoyment. to play. As a global leader, The Toy Association produces the world-renowned Toy Fair; defends the interests of members worldwide; supports the Canadian Toy Association; services the International Council of Toy Industries and the International Toy Industry CEO Roundtable; and chairs the committee that reviews and revises the widely imitated American ASTM F963 toy safety standard.

SOURCE The Toy Association

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Stay ahead of the distortion of a cyberattack? https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/stay-ahead-of-the-distortion-of-a-cyberattack/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 17:23:33 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/stay-ahead-of-the-distortion-of-a-cyberattack/ One of the most sacred responsibilities of all cybersecurity professionals is the protection of information. Company financial data, customer information, sales records, and product design are all critical to the success of an organization. Every firewall, IDS, MFA, and email security is designed to protect and stop cyberattacks. Cybercriminals are always looking for new ways […]]]>

One of the most sacred responsibilities of all cybersecurity professionals is the protection of information. Company financial data, customer information, sales records, and product design are all critical to the success of an organization. Every firewall, IDS, MFA, and email security is designed to protect and stop cyberattacks.

Cybercriminals are always looking for new ways to steal from businesses and individuals. Considering this fact, companies should take note of the growing number of security issues and cyber threats.

DevOps Connect: DevSecOps @ RSAC 2022

However, do most cybersecurity attacks happen as described?

Hackers will use data distortion to attack businesses. For example, suppose criminals hack into your company’s cloud. In this case, they can upload fake documents instructing employees to transfer money from their accounts to the criminals’ accounts or further compromise their security.

A company’s loss of control over its business practices can lead to a variety of risks, which cybercriminals are quick to exploit. More and more companies are using artificial intelligence (AI) to improve their efficiency. However, deploying unproven artificial intelligence (AI) could lead to unexpected results, including an increased risk of cybercrime.

Years ago, I served several K12 school districts as a sales engineer. I focused on cybersecurity and data protection. I used to spend hours meeting with school officials to discuss how to protect their data. Many laughed at the idea of ​​protecting student data. “We have other problems, and no budget” became the common theme. I also learned that many school principals often discuss real security breaches among themselves. Most would encourage their peers to “deny everything”.

As a parent of two wonderful children and a cybersecurity professional, this attitude made me sick.

Fortunately, with the passage of FERPA – The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that grants parents the right to access their children’s school records, the right to request modification of records and the right to have some control over the disclosure of personally identifiable information.

Although enforcement of FERPA is left to the Department of Education, there is some sense of accountability for data and disclosure of events.

With the Shanghai hack showing the usability possible to steal over a billion records, have cybersecurity operations failed? Well, that depends on who you believe.

The hacker who claimed responsibility for the data exfiltration has demanded $200,000.00 in bitcoins or the group will release the names and addresses of over a billion citizens in China. Distortion or reality? Cybersecurity professionals have faced this challenge for years.

Growing Attack Vectors – True or False Flag?

Ransomware, management console attacks, and whale phishing continue to spread to new attack surfaces in organizations. Even with advanced AI and ML, data exfiltration, account takeovers, and denial of service attacks will continue to have an impact. What critical steps can SecOps, Netops and DevOps, and Business Continuity take to communicate?

  • In the case of ransomware, does the organization have to pay the ransom?
  • Does the organization have to issue a statement to the public confirming the event within the time period required by law?
  • Should the organization publicly deny the event as a possible distortion campaign?
  • Will cyber insurance continue to be an option that organizations can rely on?

Ultimately, having a communication plan designed to reduce information distortion is essential. Sending the right message to employees, partners, and shareholders helps reduce additional self-inflicted drama while keeping parties informed of the truth.

Some organizations demonstrate greater responsibility in managing a cyber event. Others hide in the shadows, hoping no one will find out. We live in a connected world; everyone knows more than we think.

Early disclosure of an event helps anticipate distortion. Hackers and cybercriminals may misrepresent the facts of the hacker when the actual damage may have been minimal.

What can organizations do?

  • Invest in security monitoring, response and proactive controls.
  • Collect your data
  • Classify your data and set retention
  • Leverage the MITER ATT&CK framework as a threat hunting tool – Know where and how attacks are happening.
  • Leverage the Lockheed Martin Kill Chain Process – Know how the attack happened (if it happened)

Knowing what happened, how it happened, and if it happened is the best way to combat hacker warp attacks.

Until next week,

John

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USPTO welcomes Derrick Brent as Deputy Director https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/uspto-welcomes-derrick-brent-as-deputy-director/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 20:59:24 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/uspto-welcomes-derrick-brent-as-deputy-director/ WASHINGTON — Gina M. Raimondo, U.S. Secretary of Commerce, and Kathi Vidal, Undersecretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), today announced Derrick Brent as as the new Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property. Property and Deputy Director of the USPTO (“Deputy Director”), effective […]]]>

WASHINGTON — Gina M. Raimondo, U.S. Secretary of Commerce, and Kathi Vidal, Undersecretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), today announced Derrick Brent as as the new Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property. Property and Deputy Director of the USPTO (“Deputy Director”), effective August 1.

“I am delighted to welcome Derrick to the US Innovation Agency,” said Director Vidal. “Derrick’s broad and deep experience in intellectual property, politics, government and industry will serve the agency well. His work in the private and public sectors, working with a wide range of IP constituencies in different industries across the country, from Georgia to Ohio to California, and fighting for civil rights and the rights of people under -funded and underrepresented, will undoubtedly lift this agency to new heights. I am thrilled to partner with Derrick to scale innovation across our country and bring more to impact.

In his new role, Brent serves as Principal Advisor to Director Vidal, managing a broad portfolio of programs and operations for one of the largest intellectual property (IP) offices in the world, with over 13,000 staff and a budget. more than $4 billion annually. His responsibilities include working with Director Vidal to lead the USPTO, advancing intellectual property policy and procedures for the benefit of the country, expanding USPTO outreach efforts to further encourage and support innovation and national entrepreneurship, and execute agency policies, priorities and programs.

“It is an honor and a privilege to be asked to serve by Secretary Raimondo and Director Vidal,” Brent said. “I look forward to adding my hard work and skills to the dedicated team at the USPTO. Together, we will continue to advance and expand American innovation, across the country and around the world.

Brent’s career includes extensive work in public service and the private sector, including significant experience in intellectual property law and work to help startups as well as those who are underrepresented in the intellectual property community. . He served for six years as Chief Counsel to Senator Barbara Boxer, where he was responsible for an extensive portfolio including intellectual property and constitutional matters, civil rights, telecommunications and judicial appointments. During his time in the Senate, Brent was recognized as one of the most knowledgeable advisers on intellectual property and a respected authority on the America Invents Act of 2011 and other impactful legislative initiatives. He has worked closely with the intellectual property community in the senator’s home state of California and across the country, including former USPTO directors and experts, forging consensus as possible, bringing important issues to the attention of senior committee staff, researching and writing proposals, and advising and informing constituents.

Brent has served in all three branches of the federal government: executive, legislative and judicial. In addition to his work as Chief Counsel in the United States Senate, he served as Clerk for the Hon. Algenon L. Marbley, Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio. After practicing with the law firm Vorys, Sater, Seymour and Pease LLP in Ohio, he served for six years as a senior prosecutor in the United States Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, where he received a special prize for his work.

Most recently, Brent has worked as a consultant, advising startups on a variety of intellectual property issues, operations, strategy, analytics and risk mitigation across many functional areas. Prior to joining the USPTO, he served on the management team of Cut Golf, a start-up golf equipment and apparel company. He provided critical advice, analysis and project management to founders on a variety of topics, including intellectual property, contracts, marketing/advertising, business development, design/performance analysis and supply chain management, resulting in continued sales and customer growth for award-winning products.

Prior to becoming a lawyer, Brent worked for General Motors as an engineer in the Powertrain division. There he managed the engineering and commercial activities of several contract manufacturing facilities across the country. He was responsible for product design, new product validation, production processes and improvements, testing, inventory and budgets. He designed and implemented a warranty tracking system that dramatically improved quality and production.

Brent holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from The Ohio State University and a Juris Doctorate from Northwestern University School of Law (now Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law).

Brent’s full biography is available on the USPTO website when he was sworn in on August 1.

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Amazon Promotes Two Executives to SVP; Providence Executive Named COO of Teladoc; and more – GeekWire https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/amazon-promotes-two-executives-to-svp-providence-executive-named-coo-of-teladoc-and-more-geekwire/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/amazon-promotes-two-executives-to-svp-providence-executive-named-coo-of-teladoc-and-more-geekwire/ James Hamilton, left, and Drew Herdener have each been promoted to senior vice president at Amazon. — Amazon promoted two executives to senior vice president: James Hamilton, a distinguished company engineer; and Drew Herdenwho directs global communications. Both were previously vice presidents of Amazon. Promotions reflect the scope and impact of their work, according to […]]]>
James Hamilton, left, and Drew Herdener have each been promoted to senior vice president at Amazon.

Amazon promoted two executives to senior vice president: James Hamilton, a distinguished company engineer; and Drew Herdenwho directs global communications.

Both were previously vice presidents of Amazon. Promotions reflect the scope and impact of their work, according to the company. Both joined Amazon’s management team a year ago. The promotions were announced inside Amazon last Thursday.

Hamilton focused for many years on Amazon Web Services, working for Andy Jassy, ​​then Amazon’s chief cloud officer. He moved last year to a broader technical role, including but not limited to AWS, reporting to Jassy as CEO of Amazon.

Herdener has been with the company for over 19 years. He reports to Jassy on an interim basis after Jay Carney, the company’s global head of policy and communications, last week announced his intention to leave for Airbnb.

Gary Rosenfeld was named Vice President of Business Development at big fish games. Running his own consulting firm, BD Lab, Rosenfeld previously worked on business development and strategy with companies including Pixel United, Discovery Communications and Universal Music Group. Prior to starting his own company, he held executive positions at 20th Century Fox and other companies.

Seattle-based Big Fish, which sold Aristocrat for nearly $1 billion in 2018, also introduced the a new president in May: Larry Plotnickformer General Manager of Games for Amazon Prime.

Mike Waters. (Photo Teladoc Health)

mike waters is now chief operating officer of Teladoc Health, leaving Providencewhere he most recently served as Executive Vice President and General Manager of Ambulatory Care Network.

Waters worked more than nine years in Providence, based in Renton, Wash., which has 52 hospitals and hundreds of clinics. Prior to Providence, Waters was administrative director at Swedish Medical Group.

Purchase, New York-based Teladoc serves 51.5 million members in more than 175 countries with “virtual care for the whole person.” Waters’ move follows March departure of digital director from Providence Aaron Martin. Martin became vice president of healthcare at Amazon, which announced last week that it would acquire Teladoc rival One Medical.

Dirk Nagorsen has been appointed chief physician at cell therapy startup Affini-T Therapeutics. Nargorsen previously spent ten years at Amgen, where he most recently served as vice president of early development and therapeutic lead for early development in hematology and oncology.

At Amgen, Nagorsen oversaw programs for T-cell agents and for Lumakras (sotorasib), the first approved treatment targeting KRAS, also a target at Affini-T. Earlier this month, the company added to its board with Jill DeSimonewho most recently served as President of US Oncology at Merck.

Yvan Willow was hired as sendinbluechief technology officer. He leaves the electronic market company Octopia, where he was vice president of engineering, growing his team from eight to 300 engineers. Prior to that, he was CTO for France for digital consultancy Publicis Sapient.

Paris-based Sendinblue, which sells marketing and sales tools to businesses, has its US home in Seattle. The company is looking to fill 60 positions, a third of which will be under the responsibility of Saule.

— Seattle start-up Mason appointed Phil Moon as Chief Financial Officer and Bernard Richardson as Vice President of Operations. Mason provides customers with bespoke hardware and software for single-use Android devices.

Moon was previously an executive at Grove Collaborative, a green home commodities company, and helped lead its recent public listing through a SPAC merger. Bernard was previously director of product operations at Sunrun, a clean solar energy company, and at Meta. He has also worked for Apple, Amazon, Microsoft and Hewlett Packard.

Other personnel changes in the Pacific Northwest tech industry:

  • Soojung Smith is now commercial director of Kodrawhich automates greenhouse operations and recently won the autonomous greenhouse challenge at Wageningen University and Research in the Netherlands.
  • Sean Maier joined the investment management company WestRiver Group as a senior partner, leaving Meridian Capital.
  • Alpine Immune Sciences appointed Jorn Drappa to its board of directors. Drappa co-founded Viela Bio, which was acquired last year for $3.1 billion.
  • Real estate start Plunk appointed Joan Woodward and Jeff Zajkowski as business leaders.
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The seed stage is the perfect place to start your startup career https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/the-seed-stage-is-the-perfect-place-to-start-your-startup-career/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 04:00:06 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/the-seed-stage-is-the-perfect-place-to-start-your-startup-career/ There’s so much hype around being the founder of a startup. Yes, the world needs more founders, but sometimes I feel like people want to start something because the title is hot or because they’re going to get rich. The reality is being a founder really is, really tough – and it’s not for everyone. […]]]>

There’s so much hype around being the founder of a startup. Yes, the world needs more founders, but sometimes I feel like people want to start something because the title is hot or because they’re going to get rich. The reality is being a founder really is, really tough – and it’s not for everyone.

But there’s good news: you can enjoy the same fun and experience of being a founder by joining an early-stage startup. Specifically, I’m referring to being one of the first ten employees of a company that raised $2-5 million from good investors.

So if you’re looking to join a young, fast-growing company and accelerate your career, the seed stage is your sweet spot. Here’s why and how you can find these opportunities.

The advantages of joining a startup in the seed phase

Yes, there is a risk in joining a startup in the seed phase. But I think the level of risk is very misunderstood and overhyped. This is very different from the level of risk a founder takes on starting from scratch.

“Joining an early-stage startup will also give you a title boost and more experience to propel you into your next job.

A seed-stage business is still so young that you are integral to shaping its future. It’s fun and has very founder-like vibes. There is the camaraderie of working together to make something work that can often be lost in later stages when a lot of time and energy is spent trying to implement systems or undo legacy ways of doing things. . And if you’re a generalist, chances are you’ll be involved in many different aspects of the business – from sales to engineering to fundraising to expanding your skillset. It’s very similar to the overview of a company that a founder gets.

Joining an early-stage startup will also give you a title boost and more experience to catapult you into your next job.. Even if you have to take a slight pay cut (which usually isn’t that big), you’ll earn even more in your next job given your experience solving real-world problems and a level of responsibility people from a corporate background won’t be able to match.

Startups are generally quite open to trading titles – if you have a post-startup job in mind, don’t be afraid to trade for the title that you think will get you where you want to be in your next role.

This is especially relevant for people who don’t have a ton of experience and are early in their careers. If you join a startup that is past the seed stage, the team will be large enough that the founders are looking for proven specialists for the roles. At this point, you won’t have the ability to punch above your weight.

I know I started off by saying that not everyone is destined to be a Founder or should feel pressure to be one, but joining an early team will give you the necessary experience if you decide it’s is the path you want to take. Being involved in a company’s formation days is a highly valued experience for investors – in case you are considering fundraising for your own startup.

The one reason people often advise against joining early-stage startups is because of the compensation. The company doesn’t yet have the track record or the money to pay big salaries. But base pay is often not as bad as you think. You’ll also likely get enough equity to get rich if the startup is successful.

How to Find a Seed-Stage Business to Join

So how do you find the perfect start-up company to join? Young companies are inherently risky, but those that have been backed by reputable investors are much more likely to have strong potential.

  1. Find out which companies have recently joined prestigious accelerators like Y Combinator;
  2. Contact top VCs, tell them the role you’re looking for and attach your CV, then ask them “What new companies are you most interested in?” “. VCs love helping their startups find great talent, so they’ll be happy to have them.
  3. Follow the tech media to see who recently raised a fundraiser. A startup that has just grown is definitely a startup looking for talent.

When interviewing startups, here are some important things to look for when evaluating the company:

  1. Do you get along well with the founders and do you believe in them?
  2. Do you believe in the vision?
  3. Do you connect to the problem and the product? Does it make you want to work on it?
  4. Is the team that opens up to you proven to evolve in the role you want to occupy?
  5. Do you have similar approaches to product creation? For example, it can cause a lot of friction if the team likes to create rambling MVPs. [minimum viable products] and you prefer well-defined and fully integrated products.
  6. Similarities in work ethic: some teams work very late, others don’t. Make sure you are on the same page with work/life balance as the startup you are joining.

Why an early-stage startup may not be right for you

It’s going to be a roller coaster ride, chances are the boot will spin, things won’t work, etc. You need to be able to handle those turns and enjoy the ride.

You will need to get your hands dirty. Small startups are very disjointed and they do things that don’t scale, which means that all of your hard work won’t be glorious. If you’re an engineer, you might have to build less-than-perfect MVPs, and if you’re a businessman, you’ll do a lot of manual work.

Be prepared to deal with less structured advice and mentoring; while the team will be there to help you, everyone is very busy. This means that you will often have to perform ambiguous tasks, be quite autonomous and do a good job. Early-stage startups are different from large corporations in that they lack the resources for strong training and mentorship programs.

But if these risks and uncertainties sound like something exciting rather than scary, you wouldn’t make a better choice than to join a start-up company.

Yarden Shaked is co-founder and CEO of Varos.

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How restaurant menus are changing https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/how-restaurant-menus-are-changing/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 13:38:00 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/how-restaurant-menus-are-changing/ As said to ABC News, menu engineer Greg Rapp says carefully described dishes can motivate diners to place orders. In a field experiment by The Association for Consumer Research, descriptively listed dishes not only increased sales by almost 30%, but also had a positive impact on customers’ attitude towards their meal, the restaurant and their […]]]>

As said to ABC News, menu engineer Greg Rapp says carefully described dishes can motivate diners to place orders. In a field experiment by The Association for Consumer Research, descriptively listed dishes not only increased sales by almost 30%, but also had a positive impact on customers’ attitude towards their meal, the restaurant and their future return plans. . Maximizing sales and satisfying customers requires finesse, notes Cubeand some restaurants have turned to regularly updating their menus to account for customer preferences and supply issues.

postist cites the pandemic for consumers’ desire to make more health-conscious decisions, and restaurants have responded by offering more plant-based dishes and ingredient substitutions. “People have built a deeper relationship with food during the pandemic,” said chef Nuno Mendes de Lisboeta Eater. “They don’t want to be so passive about a menu anymore.” At the same time, rising spending has impacted the bottom line of many companies, reports CNBC, and lighter menus can result in higher profits. The editors of Flavor & The Menu warn against the “democratization of innovation” as customer behavior on social media can significantly influence business operations (via modern restaurant management). As restaurants continue to seek to grow profitable businesses, diners must remain at the center of the design experience.

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Supplier Entrepreneur of the Year 2022: Amin Siddiqui, imprintID https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/supplier-entrepreneur-of-the-year-2022-amin-siddiqui-imprintid/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 23:48:58 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/supplier-entrepreneur-of-the-year-2022-amin-siddiqui-imprintid/ “Wait a second, what is a lanyard?” Amin Siddiqui asked on the phone. It was 2009 and his childhood friend Shamim Kabir was calling him with a proposal. Kabir owned a factory in China that made bags. It turned out that the straps on these bags were the same material used to make […]]]>

“Wait a second, what is a lanyard?” Amin Siddiqui asked on the phone. It was 2009 and his childhood friend Shamim Kabir was calling him with a proposal. Kabir owned a factory in China that made bags. It turned out that the straps on these bags were the same material used to make lanyards.

For Siddiqui, the time had come. He was already working as an engineer, he had just bought a house with his wife Romana, was starting a family and faced the reality of rapidly escalating expenses. And although he loved studying engineering when he came to the United States from Bangladesh for college, he found his heart was not in it. Instead, he found himself turning to entrepreneurship and business technology. Previous business opportunities hadn’t gone very far before he got Kabir’s call.

Of course, there was always that annoying business of discovering the meaning of a cord. Familiar with the product but not the term, a quick Google search brought Siddiqui up to speed. Two hundred dollars and an eBay account later, and he was in business.

It was from these humble beginnings that Siddiqui officially launched imprintID (asi/73651) in 2010 and built it into a successful vendor with 33% growth in 2021 and projected sales of $27 million this year. The rewards abound – a 4.7 star rating on ESPseveral years as a Counselor Distributor Choice Awards finalist and high marks in a recent ASI survey of today’s most trusted vendors.

Getting there, however, was anything but easy. In the early years, Siddiqui was still working full-time as an engineer and devoting his time to imprintID late at night. It was a barrage of 18 hour days. “A lot of the credit goes to my wife,” Siddiqui acknowledges. It wasn’t until 2012 that he quit his engineering career and directed all his professional endeavors to imprintID. “It wasn’t easy, but I savored every moment of it. I wouldn’t do otherwise,” he said. “It’s the best thing that ever happened to me.”

How did Siddiqui make imprintID stand out in a crowded market? He reduced overhead and constantly strived to improve quality. Top-notch customer service was a must, with the goal of answering the phone within three rings and responding to email inquiries within 30 minutes. Much of it was made possible by a close-knit team. In fact, almost everyone from those early years is still in the business. “Sometimes their dedication and commitment make me look bad,” remarks Siddiqui. “They are our extended family and made this possible – credit goes to each of them.”

Siddiqui’s knack for leveraging technology, stemming from his engineering background and methodical mind, was also a differentiating factor. “It was my interest 15 years ago: how can we automate a business instead of running it the old fashioned way?” he says. In 2015, for example, imprintID launched an ERP system that fully automates everything: illustration, approval, production and much more. Siddiqui says it would be impossible for a company of imprintID’s current size — 72 employees — to process its current load of 150 orders a day without such robust automation.

For seven years, imprintID has been one of Meg Diamond’s premier supplier partners. A “main catalyst” at Geiger (asi/202900), she praises the company’s smooth order flow as well as its ability to quickly produce virtual samples and deliver out-of-the-box solutions. “ImprintID provides this rare instance of quality, service, and reliable pricing all in one place,” says Diamond, who is based in Timonium, MD. “Amin and the imprintID team are the real thing and have continued to perform even over the past two tough years.” Diamond easily recommended imprintID to other Geiger colleagues and heard positive feedback about their experiences. “I guess Amin and his team will no longer be one of my best kept secrets to success!” She adds.

Despite the success, Siddiqui is not resting on his laurels. A very early pivot to PPE in 2020 led him to invest heavily in sublimation. Now, the company’s RayOm sublimation line (named after her young sons Rayyan and Omar) includes shirts, towels, socks and more; a high-end sportswear line comparable to Under Armor is set to launch this fall. Next year, imprintID will move into a new 60,000 square foot facility, the additional space of which will support the company’s planned goal to outsource 40% of its products by 2025. to China,” says Siddiqui, who is also looking at sourcing options in Mexico. With plans to double its number of employees over the next two years, Siddiqui is aiming for 2025 to become a top 40 supplier.

“We need to make sure we continue to improve our service, engagement and transparency to our distributors,” Siddiqui says in reference to the expected growth. “If it falls through the cracks, it’s going to come and haunt us.”

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TBI Expands Partner Resources with New Solutions Engineer https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/tbi-expands-partner-resources-with-new-solutions-engineer/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 14:04:55 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/tbi-expands-partner-resources-with-new-solutions-engineer/ TBI Expands Partner Resources with New Solutions Engineer Leading technology service provider demonstrates commitment to channel partners by adding Andrew Marshall to growing team of solution architects and subject matter experts. CCT, the nation’s leading technology distributor, announces the addition of Andrew Marshall, Solutions Engineer, to its growing team of technology solutions experts. This addition […]]]>

TBI Expands Partner Resources with New Solutions Engineer

Leading technology service provider demonstrates commitment to channel partners by adding Andrew Marshall to growing team of solution architects and subject matter experts.

CCT, the nation’s leading technology distributor, announces the addition of Andrew Marshall, Solutions Engineer, to its growing team of technology solutions experts. This addition will provide optimal support for TBI partners looking to find the best solutions and services for their customers, while investing in complex technologies.

Marshall joins TBI after spending more than 10 years in the Channel, the last four working as vCom Solutions‘ Technical Solutions Manager. In this role, Marshall was responsible for creating custom technology roadmaps focused on positive customer outcomes, improving vendor-customer relationships, managing customer product sales lifecycles, and driving revenue in sales of network solutions. Landing several multimillion-dollar contracts in networking infrastructure and regularly exceeding annual sales quotas of $200,000 in recurring monthly revenue, Marshall has proven to be an asset to the organization, adding value to clients. until his departure.

Prior to working at vCom Solutions, Marshall worked for technology organizations TelePacific Communications, Windstream Communicationsand Broadband wave.

In his new role at TBI, Marshall will serve as a Solutions Engineer, providing partners with insight into the best technology solutions to help them shorten the sales cycle with their customers.

Read also : The top three data issues that can hinder business growth

“My role is to understand a client’s situation and create solutions to address it. I provide all clients with as much information as they are willing to ingest so they can make an informed decision on what will be right for their organization,” said marshal when asked about his new role.

“We are delighted to welcome another member to the TBI engineering team. Andrew joins TBI with expertise in networking, SD-WAN and managed services. He joins us after spending time with a partner organization, bringing a fresh perspective to the team and helping us provide truly exceptional support as technical resources to our partners around the world,” said the Director of TBI solution engineering, Joe Fizor.

When he’s not working, Marshall enjoys spending time with his wife, two children and their dogs. Marshall enjoys being active in his local community and often volunteers at his son’s preschool and coaches a youth swim team.

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Renee Kirby can’t imagine her life without art – Baltimore Sun https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/renee-kirby-cant-imagine-her-life-without-art-baltimore-sun/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 12:02:23 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/renee-kirby-cant-imagine-her-life-without-art-baltimore-sun/ From powerful abstract expressionist oil paintings to vibrant watercolors for wine labels, Silver Run artist and arts educator Renee Kirby brings meaning to the moment by doing what she was born to do. “I have to make art because it grounds me and helps me cope with everyday life,” Kirby said. “Art is an outlet. […]]]>

From powerful abstract expressionist oil paintings to vibrant watercolors for wine labels, Silver Run artist and arts educator Renee Kirby brings meaning to the moment by doing what she was born to do.

“I have to make art because it grounds me and helps me cope with everyday life,” Kirby said. “Art is an outlet. I think I would lose my mind if I couldn’t paint.

Art is in Kirby’s blood. Both of his parents were creative. His late father, a former Westinghouse engineer, was a carpenter who built and flew model airplanes. Her mother used to help in her grandfather’s tailor shop in Brooklyn Park when she was only 7 years old and she continues to customize clothes to this day.

Kirby remembers dying Ukrainian Easter eggs with her mother, and one of her fondest childhood memories was when they drew each other.

“She drew pictures for me to color in,” Kirby said. “I remember a Raggedy Ann that she drew and then I tried to copy it.”

Kirby first realized she had an unusual talent for art in a third-grade art class while sitting under a tree sketching landscapes. When the other students saw his work, they brought him their sketchbooks.

“I did their drawings for them while they were performing,” she said.

At Patapsco Middle School in Howard County, Kirby was invited to join the Gifted and Talented Arts Program.

“I was involved in performing arts and visual arts,” she said. “My work was featured in county art shows. Getting recognition and winning ribbons made me work harder. Back then, I realized I could copy anything from life with incredible detail. It would blow people away.”

In high school, Kirby took art classes every semester.

“My teacher, Mr. Adkins, provided little direction,” she said, “but he was incredibly supportive and encouraging. Under his leadership, I was able to develop a solid and diversified portfolio. One of the pieces was a life-size sculpture like that of artist George Segal. Another student and I took medical plaster to make casts. We wrapped ourselves in molding, let it dry, then cut it and attached the pieces to create human shapes.

Kirby applied to only one college, the Maryland Institute College of Art, and was accepted. MICA was a wake-up call for the developing artist.

Her first year at the institute consisted of five hours of Foundation studio art classes, including painting, drawing, 2D design, color theory, life drawing, clay and metals.

“Although I was good at realism,” Kirby said, “I found it held me back in the exploration process.”

To challenge herself, Kirby majored in general sculpture studies so she could have her hand in everything. She graduated in 1989 with a Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts.

“After graduating from institute and living in town for a year or two, I moved into a windmill, converted apartment, in Sykesville in 1991.” said Kirby.

Kirby held various creative jobs in Baltimore as a technician at a jewelry manufacturer, visual display coordinator at Macy’s department store, and a muralist for a faux finish painter.

“I got married in 1993. We bought an old log house in Hampstead and spent the next 20 years renovating it,” Kirby said. She painted commissioned works when she could find the time, but when her second daughter was born, Kirby’s priorities were forced to change.

“She was born extremely premature and visually impaired,” Kirby said. “Life was a little chaotic for a while, but over time we were able to find our new normal.”

Once family life settled in, Kirby was able to get back to making art with a passion. She has been actively working, teaching and performing for 10 years.

One of her first exhibitions after her return to painting was a successful open studio at her home. “You realize how many fans you have at events like these,” Kirby said.

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Kirby joined the Carroll County Artists Guild and participated in a few of their group showcases. She was then commissioned to paint an exterior mural at Bud’s at Silver Run, a restaurant in Westminster. This touching memorial to the owner’s son resembles a Carroll County farm landscape.

Last year, the Luann Carra Gallery in Fells Point produced a popular solo exhibition of Kirby’s large Abstract Expressionist paintings. Their colorful and evocative images, often illustrating the complex vitality of nature and family, are drawn from the artist’s life experiences.

Most recently, Kirby was commissioned to paint a series of vibrant watercolor labels for Free Range Flower Winery, an innovative small-batch winery that handcrafts premium wine from organic flowers, not grapes, located in the Livermore Valley, California.

While currently working at McDaniel College, Kirby also teaches virtual art classes through 21st Century Learning, a new online platform that brings together students from around the world with forward-thinking educators in English, humanities, music, in art and nutrition.

Kirby currently sells his art to Innerbloom, a flower shop and gallery in Ocean City and through his website, reneekirby.com. A portion of sales goes to local animal rescues.

Kirby can be contacted at rkirby.kirby4@gmail.com or via reneekirby.com.

Lyndi McNulty is the owner of Gizmo’s Art in Westminster. His column, An Eye for Art, appears regularly in Life & Times.

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How to Overcome Injection Molding Supply Chain Obstacles https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/how-to-overcome-injection-molding-supply-chain-obstacles/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 04:31:39 +0000 https://www.wadsworth-pacific.com/how-to-overcome-injection-molding-supply-chain-obstacles/ Welcome to Thomas Insights – every day we post the latest news and analysis to keep our readers up to date with what’s happening in the industry. Sign up here to get the day’s top stories straight to your inbox. “There are challenges in every industry,” says Kyra Stawson, technical sales engineer at Xometry. When […]]]>

Welcome to Thomas Insights – every day we post the latest news and analysis to keep our readers up to date with what’s happening in the industry. Sign up here to get the day’s top stories straight to your inbox.

“There are challenges in every industry,” says Kyra Stawson, technical sales engineer at Xometry.

When auto sales took a hit during COVID-19, it impacted injection molding demand. After all, injection molding is a reliable manufacturing process for vehicle parts because of its consistent quality and durability and because plastic parts are lightweight, allowing for fuel consumption. It is used to craft everything from bumpers to dashboards, from radio controls to cup holders.

After a dip during COVID-19, injection molding has not only rebounded, but is should grow its market size. In particular, the acceleration of the packaging market is linked to injection molding as it offers microwaveable and reusable solutions for food packaging, which helps reduce the carbon footprint of companies.

There are many advantages of injection molding. These include that the manufacturing process can provide a very complex part design; fast production and short turnaround times – Xometry’s injection molding turnaround time starts at just 10 working days — flexibility in materials, colors and finishes; and low labor costs.

Yet supply chain challenges related to COVID-19 continue to present themselves. So we turned to Stawson to find out how the world’s largest digital manufacturing marketplace is overcoming current hurdles in the injection molding industry.

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Kyra Stawson

Thomas Insights (TI): How does having a large international partner base enable Xometry to overcome challenges?

Kyra Stawson (KS): There are many different moving parts. Just because you have an injection molding machine doesn’t mean you can make the parts. You need to have the right equipment. And, you need to have the proper material suppliers.

We always want to find a solution no matter what. Our network of more than 5,000 partners gives us many really interesting solutions when we encounter challenges.

TI: What are some of the current supply chain challenges in the injection molding industry?

KS: Especially nowadays with what is happening in the world, we have experienced a lot of material shortages at all levels. But any commercially available material, we can find a way to find it. Even if our customers request a specific grade of material that is not available, we will go so far as to suggest an alternative and ensure that it is acceptable for the project.

TI: What is the impact of the plastic shortage, in particular, on the injection molding industry?

KS: The shortage of raw materials is having a heavy impact on the industry. Often we use fiberglass reinforced materials, and there is a shortage of glass right now. If a certain grade of material is not readily available, we will offer an alternative. We will work out a solution with the customer to make sure it will work for their application.

I work on the pre-sales side, so what I try to do is if a customer comes to me and they ask me for a certain quality of material, I say, “Have you be two other materials in mind that will work for this application? just in case we have a situation where we can’t get this material? “I’m asking this just to be proactive, and then if it comes down to that, we’re reactive on the back end and working to provide an alternative to make sure it works for the client. If we can’t get it, no one can.

TI: Some sources report that there are also delays in obtaining the steel blocks used for the molds. Are you seeing slower production times?

KS: Specific to Xometry, we haven’t seen too much of an impact in this regard. But we offer many different grades of tool steel. From aluminum to your Class A 101 tools, we can supply you with anything in between.

The fact that we operate outside of our partner network means that each partner already has supply chains in place, where they have relationships with material distributors who have relationships with tool shops if they don’t do it themselves internally. So somewhere within our network we can find a solution.

If we can’t find something, it means they won’t have much luck elsewhere. We are always working to find solutions and can offer alternatives. We are willing to help the customer determine what they need or what they should do if a problem like this should arise.

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Image Credit: Zyabich / Shutterstock.com

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